Turnagain Pass Avalanche Forecast RSS

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ARCHIVED FORECAST - All forecasts expire after 24 hours from the posting date/time.
Issued
Wed, November 16th, 2016 - 7:00AM
Expires
Thu, November 17th, 2016 - 7:00AM
Forecaster
CNFAIC Staff
The Bottom Line

Temperatures are finally getting cooler and a dusting of white stuff has made it as low at 1000′ in Turnagain Pass. A few folks have been hiking into the alpine, but  very thin snow cover and early season hazards exist in the mid and upper elevations. We are getting excited for the season and will be in the field over the next few days. Stayed tuned for a more detailed snowpack update on Saturday morning (Nov.19).  

Today’s educational theme is  GET OUT OF HARMS WAY  and it’s the fifth of the five GETS!    Know Before You Go video link.

The overall goals of Know Before You Go are being prepared, educated and having a strategy for traveling in avalanche terrain. Always match your terrain choice to the current avalanche conditions.  If the avalanche conditions are too dangerous don’t go into avalanche terrain. On days when the conditions are less dangerous, you  must know how to identify high consequence terrain and maintain a safe distance.  Most avalanche accidents occur on(or beneath) slopes with a steepness between 30 – 45 degrees, therefore it is crucial be able to evaluate slope angles in order to move through the terrain safely. This is another reason to take an avalanche course.  

Always practice safe travel rituals. Minimize exposure by identifying safe zones and traveling one at a time in avalanche terrain. This requires good communication and spotting your partners while they travel to/from these islands of safety. For snowmachiners this can be extra challenging due to much faster speeds and greater distances. Discuss your route with your partners and always regroup in designated safe zones, well away from slopes that can avalanche.  Remember even small slopes can have deadly consequences.

 

*Be aware of summer use trails that may have an avalanche hazards above. Places like Crow Pass Trail in Girdwood, Byron Trail in Portage and Flattop in Anchorage are examples of popular summer trails that cross through avalanche terrain. In the winter months it is best to avoid these places unless you have appropriate rescue gear and avalanche training. Below is a photo of three people hiking on Crow Pass Trail on Sunday Nov.13.

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Wed, November 16th, 2016
Alpine
Above 2,500'
No Rating (0)
Avalanche risk
Treeline
1,000'-2,500'
No Rating (0)
Avalanche risk
Below Treeline
Below 1,000'
No Rating (0)
Avalanche risk
Alpine
Above 2,500'
Avalanche risk
No Rating (0)
Treeline
1,000'-2,500'
Avalanche risk
No Rating (0)
Below Treeline
Below 1,000'
Avalanche risk
No Rating (0)
Danger Scale:
No Rating (0)
Low (1)
Moderate (2)
Considerable (3)
High (4)
Extreme (5)
Avalanche Problem 1
  • Glide Avalanches
    Glide Avalanches
Glide Avalanches
Glide Avalanches are the release of the entire snow cover as a result of gliding over the ground. Glide avalanches can be composed of wet, moist, or almost entirely dry snow. They typically occur in very specific paths, where the slope is steep enough and the ground surface is relatively smooth. They are often proceeded by full depth cracks (glide cracks), though the time between the appearance of a crack and an avalanche can vary between seconds and months. Glide avalanches are unlikely to be triggered by a person, are nearly impossible to forecast, and thus pose a hazard that is extremely difficult to manage.
More info at Avalanche.org

Several glide avalanches have been observed over the last week on the Southwest face of Sunburst, Tincan and Eddies. Click HERE for recent observations. It is important to remember that glides are unpredictable and can release without warning. The best way to manage this problem is to identify existing glide cracks and avoid putting yourself below them.  

Recent glide avalanche on Eddies, Southwest face. 

Weather
Wed, November 16th, 2016

A view of Seattle Ridge from the Motorized lot in Turnagain Pass.  

PRECIPITATION 24-hour data (6am – 6am)

  Temp Avg (F) Snow (in) Water (in) Snow Depth (in)
Center Ridge (1880′)        
Summit Lake (1400′)        
Alyeska Mid (1700′)        

RIDGETOP 24-hour data (6am – 6am)

  Temp Avg (F) Wind Dir Wind Avg (mph) Wind Gust (mph)
Sunburst (3812′)        
Seattle Ridge (2400′)        
Observations
Recent Observations for Turnagain Pass
Date Region Location
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04/10/20 Turnagain Avalanche: Wolverine
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04/09/20 Turnagain Observation: Bench Peak
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03/26/20 Turnagain Avalanche: Tincan – Proper (SW facing)
03/26/20 Turnagain Avalanche: Seattle Ridge
03/25/20 Turnagain Avalanche: Sunburst Uptrack @ 2000′
03/24/20 Turnagain Observation: Turnagain – Road Observations
Riding Areas
Updated Mon, October 26th, 2020

Status of riding areas across the Chugach NF is managed by the Glacier and Seward Ranger Districts, not avalanche center staff. Riding area information is posted as a public service to our users and updated based on snow depth and snow density to prevent resource damage at trailhead locations. Riding area questions contact: mailroom_r10_chugach@fs.fed.us

Area Status Weather & Riding Conditions
Glacier District
Johnson Pass
Closed
Placer River
Closed
Skookum Drainage
Closed
Turnagain Pass
Closed
Twentymile
Closed
Seward District
Carter Lake
Closed
Lost Lake Trail
Closed
Primrose Trail
Closed
Resurrection Pass Trail
Closed
Snug Harbor
Closed
South Fork Snow River Corridor
Closed
Summit Lake
Closed

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This is a general backcountry avalanche advisory issued for Turnagain Arm with Turnagain Pass as the core advisory area. This advisory does not apply to highways, railroads or operating ski areas.