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Observation: Turnagain

Location: Seattle Ridge, Main Bowl, Warm Up Bowl, Minus 3 Bowl

Date:
Observer:
Route & General Observations

Rode up Seattle Ridge to see how the storm snow was settling and bonding to the old faceted snow below.

Red Flags
Red flags are simple visual clues that are a sign of potential avalanche danger. Please record any sign of red flags below.
Obvious signs of instability
Recent Avalanches?Yes
Collapsing (Whumphing)?No
Cracking (Shooting cracks)?No
Observer Comments

New point releases coming off of steep south faces on Seattle Ridge. Roller balls from solar warming on south aspects.

Weather & Snow Characteristics
Please provide details to help us determine the weather and snowpack during the time this observation took place.
Weather

Calm, clear in the morning. Temperatures in the low 20s F all day. Temps felt much warmer in the direct sun. Weather did sock in during the afternoon along with some very light flurries of snow (no measurable accumulation).

Snow surface

10-12" of undisturbed settling powder. On the way down the Seattle Ridge up-track in the afternoon the snow surface was getting noticeably warm and beginning to bunch up in front of the snowmachines.

Snowpack

Pit 1: Seattle Ridge, 2900', NE aspect, 20 degree slope, HS:300cm, Pit depth ~100cm

We had 25cm of fist hard storm snow where we dug. Storm snow was sitting above a 2-3mm, 1 finger hard, degrading melt freeze crust. Below the crust was 15cm of fist hard facets. Tests yielded failures 25cm down from the surface at the new/old snow interface and a failure 55cm down from the surface within the old faceted snow.
Results at the new/old interface were ECTN11. Results within the old faceted snow were ECTN23.

Did lots of hand pits and side-hills. The storm snow had bonded to the old weak snow well where we poked in the snow. There did not seem to be enough storm snow, and the storm snow did not seem to have formed a cohesive enough slab to produce any propagation in the areas we poked and dug in.

Photos & Video
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